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OVER THE RAINBOW
SCARLET MACAWS ARE JUST ONE OF THE 500 OR SO BIRD SPECIES YOU MIGHT SEE ON THIS BOAT TRIP INTO THE REMOTE PERUVIAN AMAZON. MORE
COAST GUARDS
CHESTER SMITH (LEFT) AND LEROY OVERSTREET AND A LONG, STORIED TRADITION OF PROTECTING BIRDS ON 80 ISLANDS ONE THE TEXAS SHORE. MORE
NATURE’S BOUNTY
THIS PICKEREL FROG IS JUST ONE OF THE SPECIES PROFILED IN THIS ISSUE’S “EARTH ALMANAC.” ALSO: MERRY THIEVES, RECORD-BREAKING MIGRANTS. MORE
ON EDGE
THE REDDISH EGRET ABOVE IS PART OF A GALLERY OF SIX COLONIAL BIRD SPECIES THAT COULD SUFFER IF THE OIL SPILL REACHES TEXAS. MORE
Feature Articles
Editor's Note
Audubon View
Letters
Field Notes
Audubon Family
Audubon In Action
Incite
Earth Almanac
Reviews
One Picture

Oil Spill in the Gulf
Audubon magazine’s bloggers investigate the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, from its effects on birds and other wildlife, to the technology used to clean up the spill, to the politics surrounding the issue.  

Birds
Coast Guard
For nearly a century, Audubon wardens have been patrolling 80 islands off the Texas coast, using grit and determination and (sometimes) firearms to protect the birds that find sanctuary there. If the Gulf oil spill makes its way to Texas, the wardens will be ready, guarding the pelicans, egrets, and spoonbills with their formidable resolve. 

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Green Travel
Over the Rainbow
In the Peruvian Amazon, a research vessel (with ample amenities) floats through a flooded forest alive with amazing wildlife, from pink dolphins and giant otters to 13 species of primates and 500 kinds of birds.

National Parks
The Mother Lode
To many, “biodiverse” means rainforests or coral reefs. In fact, though, one of the most diverse places anywhere is Great Smoky Mountains National Park, where in 12 years biologists have identified 900-plus new species. Like slime molds? There are more than 200 here. How about bees (23 species), beetles (42), or algae (78)? They’re all in the park.

Editor’s Note

Audubon View

Letters
From our readers.

Field Notes
The oil spill and our energy future; the Gulf Coast’s Important Bird Areas: what’s at stake; Special: A tribute to former Audubon editor Les Line, a legend in environmental journalism.
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Audubon Family
Buying your child’s first pair of binoculars; tagging monarchs; an 11-year-old makes art on behalf of the Gulf’s threatened birds.

Audubon in Action
Q&A with Melanie Driscoll, from the oil spill’s front lines; gardening for nature; more.
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Incite
Salt on New Wounds
It may seem like a desert to some, but a healthy Great Salt Lake is crucial to millions of birds.

Earth Almanac
This is one good-looking frog; whistle pigs; sooty shearwaters, nature’s marathon migrants.

Reviews
For the Love of Fish
An ode to an unappreciated group of animals—and a warning about their future.

One Picture
Bubblemaker
Belugas, it seems, are full of hot air.

 

On the cover: When brown pelicans made it off the endangered species list last year, it was a huge conservation victory. But will the Gulf oil spill jeopardize this success? Photo by Randal Ford

Banner images: Scarlet macaw, by Ingo Arndt/Minden Pictures; reddish egret; Chester Smith (left) and Leroy Overstreet, by Randal Ford; pickerel frog, by Joel Sartore.


















Free Screensaver!
Click here to download a free screensaver of some of the winning shots from the first Audubon Magazine Photography Awards.