current issue web exclusives blogs multimedia archive subscribe advertisers
FOOD LOOP
LOCAL HEIRLOOM TOMATOES, ORGANIC WINE, BIRD-FRIENDLY RICE. HERE'S TO EATING WELL AND HELPING THE PLANET. MORE
GRAINS OF CHANGE
IN CALIFORNIA'S CENTRAL VALLEY, RICE FARMERS AND CONSERVATIONISTS TEAM UP TO HELP LONG-BILLED CURLEWS. MORE
FOOD CULTURE
SEED COMPANIES "BIOENGINEER" TRAITS, LIKE HERBICIDE RESISTANCE, INTO SOYBEANS. BUT IS ANY UPSIDE WORTH THE RISK? MORE
RED, WHITE, AND GREEN
WEST COAST VINEYARDS EMBRACE CHEMICAL-FREE PRACTICES.
THE RESULT: GENTLER FARMING AND BETTER WINE. MORE
GONE FISH
A TRAWL NET OVERFLOWING WITH POLLOCK. WILL OUR INSATIABLE APPETITE FOR FISH FINALLY EMPTY EVEN OUR OCEANS? MORE
Feature Articles
Editor's Note
Audubon in Action
Letters
Field Notes
Audubon Living
Organics
Currents
One Picture

Introduction
Food Cycle
The eternal food loop—harvest, prepare, savor, cleanup—has never been healthier, and better tasting, than it is right now.
View web exclusive

Birds
Grains of Change
California’s Central Valley, the epicenter of U.S. food production, isn’t the most bird-friendly place. The good news? The region’s rice farmers have joined conservationists to turn their fields into surrogate wetlands, and the birds, including long-billed curlews, are booming.

Wine
Message in a Bottle
West Coast winemakers are embracing chemical-free grapes more than ever. Whether or not they call their wines “organic,” the business can fairly be described as red, white—and green.

View web exclusive

Biotech
Food Culture
Its supporters tout the promise of drought-tolerant corn and less pollution from hog farms. Opponents worry about unforeseen and alarming threats to the environment. Whatever your feelings about the genetic engineering of food, one thing’s for sure: It’s here to stay.

Seafood
Gone Fish
Seafood guides were eye-openers when they first appeared in the late 1990s, and they still help consumers make good buying decisions. But without more enlightened fisheries policies, one day our nets will start coming up empty.

Editor’s Note

Audubon in Action
David Yarnold on saving neotropical migrants. Plus: a visit to Ohio’s Aullwood Center and Farm; a new conservation victory at Tejon Ranch; farmers in Paraguay move to help birds; more.

Letters
Readers weigh in (passionately) on “Saddle Sores,” Ted Williams’s article on wild horses.

Field Notes
Wolves find themselves in legal limbo, and enemies of the ESA see an opportunity; we sit down with the EPA’s Lisa Jackson; the Green Guru on how high migrating birds fly (hint: you’ll be amazed); more.

Audubon Living
Peeling Back the Label
As food makers look to cash in on the healthy-food movement, it’s getting harder and harder to navigate the supermarket aisle. Here’s a guide to labels you can—and can’t—trust.

Organics
Fork in the Road
Americans have done their part, turning organic food into a $25 billion industry. Now it’s time for the government to get with the program.

Currents
Urban Planting
City farms offer urban dwellers fresh local produce and the chance to connect with their inner farmer.

One Picture
Fruit for Thought
An artist wields a scanning electron microscope and a computer to present a view of food unlike any you’ve ever seen before.

 

On the cover: Last step in the food cycle. Photograph by Kang Kim. Food styling by Stephana Bottom

Banner images: Heirloom tomatoes, by Kang Kim; grassland near California’s Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area, by Brown W. Cannon III; soybeans, by Carmen Troesser; grapes, by Sara Remington.

 


















Free Screensaver!
Click here to download a free screensaver of some of the winning shots from the 2010 Audubon Magazine Photography Awards.